Wednesday, March 9, 2011

Evans, Florence May
Florence May Evans – Colorado Daily Chieftain – October 17, 1875 - The Canon City Calamity - The unfortunate occurrences mentioned in yesterday morning's dispatches are even more deplorable than at first supposed. Mrs. Evans, her child, and Mrs. Evans sister, Miss Buckingham, are all three dead. Mr. Evans left his house about 5:50 P.M., saying, "get supper ready and I will be down soon." In a half hour thereafter, a young girl was seen running from the house enveloped in flames. She fell into the gutter and was picked up by passing parties. Then the house was discovered in flames. The neighbors rushed in and found Mrs. Evans standing with all her clothes burned off except her corsets and a few shreds, with the infant lying between her feet screaming. The whole three were carried into an adjoining building. The mother lay upon the floor burned from head to foot - one solid mass of burned flesh; the sister on a bed, terribly burned and moaning in intense agony. The infant, three months old, was not supposed to be so badly burned. Its cries were heart rending. The mother about ten o'clock asked for her husband. He was called, and in a whisper she bade him good bye. Frequently during the evening she whispered her wishes that she might be given something to end her misery and put her out of existence. About ten o'clock she died, and before morning her child and sister died in intense agony. The scene at the depot, as given us by an eye witness, was one circulated to move the stoutest heart. The husband and father paced the depot platform frantically. His grief knew no bounds. Presently a conveyance drove up. A small coffin was removed and placed in the baggage car. This contained the little babe. Next came the wife and her sister. The dead having been deposited in the car, the husband was helped to a seat and the train started for Colorado Springs. As far as can be ascertained this melancholy affair was the result of the careless use of kerosene. It is said that Miss Buckingham attempted to light a fire with the treacherous fluid, when it caught and the can exploding covered the three unfortunates with the blazing oil. Mr. Evans had been in the express business at Colorado Springs for several months before removing to Canon City. His late wife is a sister of Mr. R. Buckingham, the proprietor of the Colorado Springs Free Press. She was a lady of fine personal appearance, and above all a kind wife and affectionate mother. The remains of the three will probably be interred at Colorado Springs. Note: This baby was buried in Evergreen Cemetery in Colorado Springs under the last name of Evens. Her tombstone states that she was 4 months, and 15 days old, and was the daughter of C. F. and Jennie Evens, when she died on October 15, 1875.


Evans, Jennie Buckingham
Jennie Buckingham Evans – Pueblo Colorado Daily Chieftain – October 17, 1875 – The Canon City Calamity – The unfortunate occurrences mentioned in yesterday morning's dispatches are even more deplorable than at first supposed. Mrs. Evans, her child, and Mrs. Evans sister, Miss Buckingham, are all three dead. Mr. Evans left his house about 5:50 P.M., saying, "Get supper ready and I will be down soon." In a half hour thereafter, a young girl was seen running from the house enveloped in flames. She fell into the gutter and was picked up by passing parties. Then the house was discovered in flames. The neighbors rushed in and found Mrs. Evans standing with all her clothes burned off except her corsets and a few shreds, with the infant lying between her feet screaming. The whole three were carried into an adjoining building. The mother lay upon the floor burned from head to foot - one solid mass of burned flesh; the sister on a bed, terribly burned and moaning in intense agony. The infant, three months old, was not supposed to be so badly burned. Its cries were heart rending. The mother about ten o'clock asked for her husband. He was called, and in a whisper she bade him good bye. Frequently during the evening she whispered her wishes that she might be given something to end her misery and put her out of existence. About ten o'clock she died, and before morning her child and sister died in intense agony. The scene at the depot, as given us by an eye witness, was one circulated to move the stoutest heart. The husband and father paced the depot platform frantically. His grief knew no bounds. Presently a conveyance drove up. A small coffin was removed and placed in the baggage car. This contained the little babe. Next came the wife and her sister. The dead having been deposited in the car, the husband was helped to a seat and the train started for Colorado Springs. As far as can be ascertained this melancholy affair was the result of the careless use of kerosene. It is said that Miss Buckingham attempted to light a fire with the treacherous fluid, when it caught and the can exploding covered the three unfortunates with the blazing oil. Mr. Evans had been in the express business at Colorado Springs for several months before removing to Canon City. His late wife is a sister of Mr. R. Buckingham, the proprietor of the Colorado Springs Free Press. She was a lady of fine personal appearance, and above all a kind wife and affectionate mother. The remains of the three will probably be interred at Colorado Springs. Note: This woman was buried in Evergreen Cemetery in Colorado Springs under the last name of Evens. Her tombstone states that she was 21 years, 9 months, and 16 days old, and was the wife of C. F. Evens, when she died on October 15, 1875.